Women Take World Stage to Highlight that Climate Change is not Gender Neutral

On Tuesday, women took to the world stage to demonstrate that climate change isn’t gender-neutral and that climate action requires them: investing in women and girls has a ripple effect that affects entire communities, and the frontline knowledge they possess is needed now more than ever, especially as new analysis has revealed that the announcements made by world leaders at COP26 still put our planet on the path to catastrophic global warming. 

Little Amal, a large puppet representing a young Syrian refugee child, arrived in Glasgow just in time for COP26’s ‘Women’s Day’ after traveling 8,000 kilometers across Europe. 

At Tuesday’s plenary, the 3.5-meter-tall living artwork surprised attendees when it walked up the stairs and hugged and gave a gift to Samoan climate activist Brianna Fruean. 

Little Amal, a large puppet representing a young Syrian refugee child, arrived in Glasgow just in time for COP26’s ‘Women’s Day’ after traveling 8,000 kilometers across Europe. 

At Tuesday’s plenary, the 3.5-meter-tall living artwork surprised attendees when it walked up the stairs and hugged and gave a gift to Samoan climate activist Brianna Fruean. 

Ms. Fruean emphasized that seeds must be watered, trimmed, and maintained in order to bear fruit and flowers, and she encouraged delegates to continue working after the conference ended. The COP26 President, Alok Sharma, made a brief intervention, but not without Little Amal and Ms. Fruean, who stood erect and watched his speech. 

Little Amal and the Syrian kids she represents are not alone in their suffering: women and girls account for 80% of those displaced by climate-related disasters and changes around the world. 

Women have had a special bond with nature for millennia. They provide significant contributions to their communities’ well-being and long-term growth, as well as to the preservation of the planet’s ecosystems, biological diversity, and natural resources. 

Women in poor nations are often the first to respond to the need to manage the natural capital that surrounds them. Women all over the world use and interact with natural resources and ecosystems on a daily basis, from collecting water for cooking and cleaning to using the land for livestock, foraging for food in rivers and reefs, and collecting firewood. 

Women are also the first to experience the effects of climate change, as they are compelled to travel longer and longer distances to get food for their families. 

Furthermore, while environmental deterioration has major repercussions for all humans, it disproportionately affects the most vulnerable members of society, particularly women, whose health is at its most vulnerable during pregnancy and motherhood. 

However, women’s contributions, or potential contributions, to the planet’s survival and development remain underappreciated. Women and girls continue to be negatively affected by unsustainable and damaging environmental management as a result of gender inequality and social marginalization. 

Discriminatory social and cultural norms, such as unequal access to land, water, and other resources, as well as their lack of participation in choices about natural resource planning and management, often lead to an underestimation of their potential contributions. 

PC: https://www.gettyimages.no/detail/news-photo/little-amal-a-giant-puppet-depicting-a-syrian-refugee-girl-news-photo/1236455643?adppopup=true