The Irish Government has Unveiled its most Ambitious Investment Plan to Date

The Irish government has released spending projections for the next decade, including the greatest national development plan in the country’s history. 

Between now and 2030, the plan calls for a total expenditure of €165 billion (£141 million) in various major projects such as housing and transportation infrastructure. 

Micheál Martin, the Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister), praised it as “unique in scale.” 

According to him, the initiative will “drive the next phase of our post-pandemic recovery” and “create thousands of jobs.” 

Capital support for the government’s Shared Island plan will be “at least doubled” to €1 billion dollars (£853 million) until 2030, with extra money for cross-border initiatives. 

Mr Martin described the €3.5 billion earmarked for north-south infrastructure as a “significant increase” in infrastructure investment. 

He described our approach to the investment as reasonable. 

The Narrow Water Bridge connecting the counties of Louth and Down, the Ulster Canal, and the A5 road, as well as extra money to be spent on greenways, higher education, biodiversity, and industrial parks, are among the projects funded by the Irish government. 

Opposition parties, on the other hand, have questioned the government’s costings and timelines, with the Labour Party denouncing the plan as a farce. 

The taoiseach outlined the coalition government’s investment goals, saying that while modernising public services, they would “respond to the housing crisis and tackle the climate emergency.” 

By the end of 2030, he wants to create 300,000 new homes, including 90,000 social housing, 36,000 affordable purchase homes, and 18,000 low-cost rental homes. 

He also stated that the planning system would be reformed quickly to solve “the planning and legal delays which hamper infrastructure and housing projects in Ireland”. 

Capital support for the government’s Shared Island plan will be “at least doubled” to €1 billion (£853 million) until 2030, with extra money for cross-border initiatives. 

The investment recommendations were provided in the form of a revamped “National Development Plan,” which is an updated version of a capital spending plan first proposed in 2018. 

The revised design is more expensive and ambitious, involving over €50 billion (£42 million) in additional investment not anticipated three years ago. 

A €35 billion (£30 million) investment programme for Ireland’s transportation system is included in the new plan, which includes suggestions for new light rail lines and 1,000 kilometres of new and enhanced pedestrian and cycling infrastructure. 

Green Party leader Eamon Ryan, who is also the environment and transport minister, said it would result in a cleaner, greener, more connected Ireland. 

Eoin Broin, Sinn Féin’s housing spokesman, called the plan “very disappointing news for housing”. In 2022, he claims that further spending on social and affordable housing will be “minimal.”  

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