Sustainable Development and Ocean Science

From ancient times onwards, it has been observed how the oceans/seas have aided in the provision of various meals (fish, for example) to humans as well as the promotion of trade and business.

Previously, only business was conducted by waterways. Even if the situation has altered since the introduction of the airplane, the necessity of marine routes is still recognized.

Unfortunately, oceans are being abused these days due to the over-exploitation of ocean/sea resources. Furthermore, oil seeps into the ocean on a regular basis, causing major concerns.

Unfortunately, oceans are being abused these days due to the over-exploitation of ocean/sea resources. Furthermore, oil seeps into the ocean on a regular basis, causing major concerns.

Natural Resource Damage Assessment is the process of estimating the effects of a spill and obtaining a settlement to pay restoration projects (NRDA).

The United Nations declared a Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (the “Ocean Decade”) from 2021 to 2030 on December 5, 2017.

The goal is to support efforts to reverse the downward trend in ocean health by uniting ocean stakeholders from around the world around a single framework that ensures ocean science can fully support countries in improving conditions for long-term ocean development.

The inaugural United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development regional dialogue took place from the 23rd to the 25th of July 2019 at the Pacific Community headquarters in Nouméa, New Caledonia, with around 100 participants from the South Pacific region.

It was organized into plenary sessions and themed workshops, with the major projected social goals for the Decade six: a clean ocean, a healthy and resilient ocean, a predictable ocean, a safe ocean, a sustainably harvested and productive ocean, and a transparent and accessible ocean.

The meeting’s goal was to assist in the preparation for the Coming Decade, including consulting with various parties and engaging regional stakeholders. It was also meant to define more precise regional scientific aims, as well as the Pacific Ocean’s long-term development requirements.

The South Pacific Ocean covers over one-third of the Earth’s surface and is home to many different ecosystems, atolls, coral reefs, and mangroves.

The Pacific Islands are made up of 22 island nations that cover 45 million square kilometers, with combined Exclusive Economic Zones that are more than four times the size of the whole European continent.

3 billion people rely on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods, making it an incalculable source of economic, social, and cultural worth. Tropical coral reefs may vanish before the turn of the century, and by 2050, there may be more plastic in the ocean than fish, according to forecasts.

Despite the importance of the ocean to human health and well-being, ocean research receives a pittance of funding, accounting for less than 2% of national research expenditures on average. 

Photo Credit: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/ocean/