Singapore’s High Court rules out pleas to decriminalize gay sex

As a major setback for the LGBTQ + community of Asia, the Singapore’s High Court has dismissed multiple pleas to decriminalize gay sex.

The pleas challenging to overturn a colonial law criminalizing gay sex under Section 377 A was dismissed by the High Court on March 30. Section 377 A criminalises any act of gross indecency between males and makes the crime punishable for up to two years in prison.

The High Court ruled the constitutional ban saying it does not infringe on articles concerning freedom of speech or equality. The complaint against the law to deem it as unconstitutional was led by a retired doctor, a LGBTQ+ rights advocate and a DJ.

Lawyer M. Ravi representing one of the complainants said, “It’s shocking to the conscience and it is so arbitrary. It is so discriminatory, this legislation”.

Despite the polls indicating towards a tolerance towards homosexuality, the court rejected it stating that just because the law is not heavily enforced, does not “render it redundant”. 

A similar rejection was faced by the community in October 2014, when attempts were made to lit the ban on gay sex.

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